The overall theme of the South African Flower Union Facebook Virtual Flower Show was   A FOCUS ON INTERPRETATION.

(SO WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR - KINDLY WRITTEN BY KIM ZIMMERMAN FOR EACH CLASS)

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS TWENTY - 'DARK MATTER'?

What is 'Dark Matter'? I asked my husband as, from a scientific point of view, I don't know. He said that according to mathematicians and physicists, there should be a whole lot more matter in the world (for the amount of energy there is) but they just do not know where it is. (There is a good definition of what 'dark matter' is if you care to look it up on Wikipedia.)

But, floral artists are generally not scientists and we tend to take things at face value. So what is 'dark matter'? Maybe something of which we are ashamed and wish to keep secret, something that lurks in the shadows of our past that we wish we hadn't been a part of. (Any 'skeleton in the cupboard' is generally 'a dark matter'.)

The key word is 'dark' and judges are going to be looking for a good portrayal of that. Competitors have to portray 'dark' and this is difficult because it begs the question of how much lighter contrast can actually be included in the design before it starts to diminish in class value.

Using a dark background with dark plant material is an additional problem to solve.

Also, work that is done in dark colours (with subtle contrasts) is notoriously difficult to photograph unless you have quite a sophisticated camera. Avoid the temptation to use a flash unless absolutely necessary.

Hope this makes some sense.

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANT

KEVIN WEBB KZN SA

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS:

1ST MERLE CHRISTIE WC SA

  

2ND GAIL TAVERNER EC SA         3RD  URSULA ELEY CANADA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED KIM ZIMMERMAN UK

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED HENDRA GOUWS NFU SA    COMMENDED ENGELA STRYDOM NW SA

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

ALMA BADENHORST MPUMALANGA SA    BEVERLEY BUTTIMER UK                

  

ASMA ANSARI PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE        GRETA FOURIE NFU SA                     

  

JANET RIDGEWAY WC NOVICE    KAREN RAUTENBACH GAU SA

  

KATHLEEN POTTON WC                    LINDA LE ROUX EC

  

LINDA BOTTAMLEY UK                         MARIE CLAUSSEN OBU SA

PHILLIPA LOUDEN UK

  

PRITESH SHAH KENYA                    PRIYA SHAH KENYA        

SHAYAI LUCERO USA

 

WHAT IS A JUDGE LOOKING FOR IN CLASS NINETEEN - STYLE STATEMENT?

It is hard for me to write about having 'a sense of style'. I don't have one and this is not a title I would gravitate towards when deciding upon which class to enter in a show. People who have an innate sense of style (and they're generally confident enough to know it) can bring that to this sort of design.

Those who are lucky enough to have contemporary style are the ones we need to watch because they are the trendsetters and the people who can keep our art form current.

Those who don't have style have to work a little harder. We are the ones who tend to fall back on timeless style - the tried and tested classics that work. We recognise the sleek sophistication of icons like Audrey Hepburn and Jackie Onassis. We know architecture and furniture that has stood the test of time and that remain popular. This is what we can bring to a title like 'Style Statement'.

Of course, we know that certain flowers have more classical style then others - Casablanca lilies, peonies and roses are style icons, along with certain orchids. Zinnias and sunflowers are not! But that doesn't mean that Zinnias and sunnies can't make a contemporary style statement in the right hands.

Basically, a title like 'Style Statement' is open for a lot of interpretation. If you're like me, you going to do something sleek and sophisticated, probably in black and white with a subtle splash of colour. However, the door is definitely open to more contemporary styling depending on the recognised trends of the day.

Congratulations to the winners:

  

1ST DOROTHY VORSTER NW SA                 2ND ANNE DALE GAU SA

  

3RD FARHANA AZIM PAKISTAN

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

ALPA SHAH  KENYA INTERMEDIATE

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED PRITESH SHAH KENYA    COMMENDED COBUS CONRADIE WC SA 

 

COMMENDED ANN PETERS CANADA

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

AMBREEN IRFRAN PAKISTAN        AMITA GUDKA KENYA INTERMEDITE

  

EILEEN O'BRIEN IRELAND        EWALD WESSELS WC SA

  

                          FARIDA KALIM PAKISTAN                HEILA GROENEWALD KZN SA                          

  

MISHA RANJANI KENYA  NOVICE        SALMA ANSARI PAKISTAN

  

SHAZIA IMRAN PAKISTAN NOVICE                SHEILA GILBERT IRELAND

  

SMITA RADIA PATEL KENYA

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS EIGHTEEN - CRAFTED BY NATURE.

I think the big thing here is that the designer has to go totally natural and find things from Nature that look like they have been 'made by the angels'. And let's face it, Nature is all around us and all one needs to do is go for a short walk to be able to pick up pieces that have dropped off the trees or have been cut back by enthusiastic gardeners and dumped outside for refuse. Branches, twigs, spathes, grasses, bark, cones, seedpods etc. are there for the taking and all of these things can go a long way towards producing a beautiful design.

I wouldn't recommend manipulation or technique - unless it looks like the wind or the birds or something natural has done it.

Nor would I recommend store bought flowers that look like they've grown up in the comfort of a greenhouse. Choose rather plant materials that look like they've weathered the elements and had a life in natural surroundings. This is an opportunity to use natural objects that have started to show their age and have been weathered by the elements.

Horticultural perfection can be 'off the table' in a class like this. Find leaves with freckles, multicoloured succulents, beach pickings that may have imperfections etc. and fashion them into something that looks as if you found it in the great outdoors.

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANTS:

VERONICA LAVOIPIERRE KZN SA

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS:

  

1ST MARJOLIJN MALAN WC SA       2ND BINDYA SHAH KENYA       

  

                          3RD FRED DU PREEZ OBU SA          HIGHLY COMMENDED BETTY O'NEILL IRELAND

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

FRANCOISE SCHAAF WC SA INTERMEDIATE

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

APRIL STEPHENS UK NOVICE                 HARSHIDA SHAH KENYA

ASMA ANSARI PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE

  

HELEN GRANT AUSTRALIA  INTERMEDIATE            HENRIETTE LOUW WC SA

  

HELEN MITCHELL AUSTRALIA               KIRSTEN VAN DIJK USA

  

LIZ PRINGLE KZN SA      LOUIS VAN AS WC SA

  

NAYNA PARRIN SHAH KENYA         NORA GALLIGHER IRELAND

  

RENEE VAN TONDER WC SA NOVICE  ROSIE ELKINS UK INTERMEDIATE

   

SAMRAH AZAM CHAUDRI PAKISTAN NOVICE   SOBIA RIAZ PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE 

 

RUBY AIJAZ DURRANI PAKISTAN NOVICE

 

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS SEVENTEEN - PARALLEL LIVES?

Some people contacted me to ask if there was a spelling mistake in the schedule and if the title was actually 'Parallel Lines'. No - why would we make the lives of the competitors that easy?

However, bringing parallel lines to this title was definitely one way to begin tackling this design. But how could you step the design up a notch so that it represented not only a design of parallel lines - but also one of 'Parallel Lives'?

What is a 'parallel life'? Well, one could get all scientific about it and start talking about alternative realities etc. but that could get very complicated. I think if one refers to a person as having a 'parallel life', it means they are living a double life (or a triple, quadruple or multiple lives depending on how much energy they've got). So, for example, a man who lives his weekend in Cape Town with his wife and kids and then flies up Johannesburg to ostensibly work for the week but also has a wife and children there (and the two wives are happily oblivious of each other because the man is juggling his balls very well) - well, said man has a 'parallel life' going on and God help him when it all comes tumbling down because he could end up with no life at all.

This is a bit of a crass example, but there are many people who appear one way in one environment e.g. at work and are totally different when they are at home or on their own.

So this design had to represent a duality (two or more different entitles) alongside each other that effectively coalesced into one design. Does this help or have I confused things even more?

 

The abstract painting is called 'Parallel Universes' and it is by Koola Adams.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS :

1ST ARTI DOSHI KENYA INTERMEDIATE

  

2ND ANJNA BECHRA PATEL KENYA          3RD ALTHEA HIGHAM WC SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMEDED LES BRENT EC SA

COMMENDED MARIEKE RIC HANSEN KZN SA

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

BERYLE LEIBBRANDT GAU SA                   EDITH RULE WC SA 

  

JANET RIDGEWAY WC SA NOV                JAYNE MERRIMAN UK

  

MARGARET BREAKS UK                    CATH SHAW UK  

MARTIE VAN ROOYEN OBU SA

  

MARY KEILEY IRELAND                       NAELA CHOHLAN PAKISTAN

 

NASREEN MAZHAR PAKISTAN NOVICE

  

PRAVINA SHAH KENYA                   RINA MARIA SCHEPERS OBU SA

SAMEENA AHMED PAKISTAN 

  

                 SANDY FORBES KZN SA              THEA HEYDENRYCH NW SA 

       

ABIDA NINI PAKISTAN NOVICE   

 

 

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS SIXTEEN - PAPER PETALS?

O.K. - this class was included in this show because paper is now regarded as plant material. Any judge who doesn't know this (or like it) could do us all a big favour and mark themselves as inactive because it is a reality! So, paper can even predominate in designs these days. Imagine that!!

Paper comes in many forms. Unfortunately, in South Africa, the beautiful organic looking papers that are available in the East are not available us unless you are spending a lot of money on buying them in and also are prepared to pay again to get them out of customs.

However, if you look around at some of the more glamorous stationary shops, you can find some pretty exciting papers - although they are usually in small sizes.

Paper can be made - if you have the tools and the patience and I know that there was a phenomenal workshop on making paper at the W.A.F.A. India Show in February - I think Parul Singhal Swarup did that one - and it has been widely reported on so I must go and see if I can find some pictures because we do have time to play around at the moment.

So, this class required you to make paper 'petals' and design with them - and I put the word petals in inverted commas because you could get quite creative with your petals. You could make actual flowers - but you didn't have to.

The big thing with an 'almost' craft class like this one was to keep the work artistic and not to produce something that looked like a 'kitschy' high school project - I'm sorry, I can't be more subtle than this.

I think there are some gorgeous designs in this section. I hope more people will be tempted to use paper in their designs. Done in the right way, it opens some exciting possibilities.

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANT

SELVIE NAICKER KZN SA

WINNERS - CONGRATULATIONS!

1ST SUSAN VILJOEN EC SA

2ND KAREN RAUTENBACH GAU SA

3RD ALMIEN RAVENS OBU SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

SCHALK VAN DYK OBU SA

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED KATHLEEN DEAN UK     COMMENDED NICOLA BREAKS UK INTERMEDIATE

OTHER ENTRANTS -

  

ALMA BADENHORST MPUMALANGA SA      ANSIE MARAIS GAU SA INTERMEDIATE

  

JAYNA SHAH KENYA                       MITSIE BACH WC SA

  

JEAN HANCOX KZN SA       JENNY JOOSTE GAU SA

  

ENA HUME GAU SA                     NAZLI ASEF PAKISTAN

SAMINA AZHAR PAKISTAN NOVICE


WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS FIFTEEN - MY OBJECT OF DESIRE?

I've published the pictures of these designs already and I must say that some people have quite unusual 'objects of desire'. A judge has to be very non judgemental about that, though!

This title was included in the schedule because we all have beautiful things that we would love to include in out floral art but can't - because they are too precious to be carried around or would be too dominant in a design that usually requires plant material to predominate.

However, this design allowed your object to dominate and you didn't have to move your object from your home.

So, I really don't understand why in some of these designs I feel like the flowers are 'the object of desire' as this was not the point of the exercise!

One of the wonders of a virtual show is that you can do some things that you wouldn't ordinarily do in an actual show. In South Africa, we wouldn't have a title like 'My Object of Desire' on a schedule because (you can trust me) if we did, most of those objects would be stolen on the day the show opens. In South Africa, you can't even include fruit in a design and rely on it being there the next day.

So, when you are given an opportunity like this, pull out a fabulous 'object of desire' and do something with it. Make the viewer fall in love with your object of desire or at least understand why you love it so.

Make it absolutely clear what your 'object of desire' is too.

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS:

1ST MARJOLIJN MALAN WC SA

  

2ND MEENA SHAH KENYA          3RD COBUS CONRADIE WC SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

WIQARUNNISA BOOLANI PAKISTAN

HIGHLY COMMENDED FRANCOISE SCHAFF WC SA

COMMENDED LIZA ATHERSTONE NFU SA

OTHER ENTRANTS

  

AMBREEN IRFAN PAKISTAN                       ELIZE GOETZ WC SA   

  

DOROTHY VORSTER NW SA                   EILEEN O'BRIEN IRELAND

  

JEFF MILNE WC SA                      JOY CHAPMAN GAU SA

  

                           JUDY GRAY WC SA                              LORRAINE ROSE WC SA                          

  

PAT LARKIN UK                             ZENOBIA BOSCH GAU SA

SAJEELA AFZAAL PAKISTAN

 

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS FOURTEEN - INNER PEACE?

Now, this is a title to which one can directly apply the elements and principles of design. Look at the picture attached which I think suggests 'Inner Peace'. (If this picture does not suggest 'Inner Peace' to you, then find one that does.) Then, answer the following questions:

What line/s can I bring to this design?

What shapes/ forms can I bring to this design?

What textures and colours suggest 'Inner Peace'?

Does a sense of inner peace suggest or include 'space'?

How can I bring the principle of balance (which is so much a part of inner peace and serenity) to this design?

What are the rhythms that suggest 'Inner Peace'? I'm guessing they'd be pretty regular.

How does this picture suggest the harmony that is necessary for 'Inner Peace'?

Once you have answered these questions, you should have the beginnings of an idea for a design you can develop and one in which a judge should be able to detect interpretive value.

Hope this helps

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANTS

COMMENDED - PAULA MONK KZN SA  

 

WINNERS - CONGRATULATIONS

1ST  -  LORRAINE ROSE WC SA

2ND  -  ANETTE BADENHORST KZN SA

3RD  -  GAIL TAVERNER EC SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - GERDA STOLS WC SA

COMMENDED - AISHA ZAHID PAKISTAN

COMMENDED - PAULA MONK KZN SA

OTHER ENTRANTS

  

ALKA SHAH KENYA                    ALTHEA HIGHAM WC SA

 

  

              ANITA JORDAAN EC  SA              DE-MARA BEZUIDENHOUT WC SA

  

ELIZE GOETZ WC SA                   GERDA STOLS WC SA

  

GWEN VAN DEN BERG WC SA NOVICE        HANNA KOCK KZN SA

  

JILL HOCKEY KZN SA                     LOUISE COMBRINCK OBU SA

  

             JUDY PREEN WC SA                LOCIA HARTZER GAU SA       

 

  

NAFISA TAPAL PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE    NADINE SMITH GAU SA NOVICE 

  

         PAT PENNEL WC SA INTERMEDIATE    SAMEENA AHMED PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE

QARRAT  AAMIR PAKISTAN

SOBIA RIAZ PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE

 

SO, WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS THIRTEEN - 'WAXED'?

I'm a bit shaken as I write this. I always go and have a look at facebook images of the titles for some inspiration. So what comes up for 'waxed' but many pictures of the numerous types of waxing procedures one can have at a beauty salon - some of which look more painful than childbirth.

A further search revealed pictures of ear wax removal which also had me feeling queasy.

So what would one be looking for in a design with the title 'Waxed'? Most obvious is the visual inclusion of melted wax which has then hardened to form a visible part of the design. This is harder and more dangerous than it sounds.

My mother and I had a go at playing with wax once - forming a base of wax, making holes in it to hold up a branch and then dribbling wax over said branches to create a winter look. The process is painstaking. The wax has to be melted (you can colour it with wax crayons), poured (without doing damage to yourself) and it dries very quickly so, if you're wanting to include mechanics, you have to act fast. You can wait until the wax is dry before trying to drill holes but this process also has problems because the wax cracks very easily.

And the tidying up process will keep you going for a week!

Besides the use of wax, there are many plant materials that look decidedly wax-like - the most obvious example is the anthirium. And then there's also a plant material called Geraldton Wax which could help interpret the title.

But, using actual wax seems the most obvious way to go. My grandmother used to just pour melted wax into a sink of cold water and it produced the most awesome shapes. I've also seen wax thrown into a bucket filled with icecubes. The wax hardens before the ice melts so you get a wonderful structure full of holes made from this process.

Think I must go on to you tube and see what I can find. I'll keep you updated!

The wax head sculpture is by Rebecca Stevenson - so I'm guessing you can sculpt with wax if that grabs your fancy.

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANT

3RD CHERYL GRIFFITHS KZN SA

WINNERS - CONGRATULATIONS

1ST MARIEKE RIC HANSEN KZN SA

2ND ODETTE PAXTON WC SA

3RD - CHERYL GRIFFITHS KZN SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED MARTIE BOSHOFF NW SA

COMMENDED ANGELIQUE PRETORIUS GAU SA

OTHER ENTRANTS 

  

COOKIE KITSON EC SA           GRETA FOURIE NFU SA

  

HEILA GROENEWALD KZN SA        PIERRE JACOBS GAU SA

  

     JOAN JORRITSMA EC SA            MARIEKE RIC HANSEN KZN SA

  

    SALMA ANSARI PAKISTAN              CHERYL GRIFFITHS KZN SA     

 

 

SO, WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS TWELVE: 'BOUND TOGETHER, TORN APART'?

Well, something like this little number by Pascal Phaner which just happened to come up on my facebook feed a couple of minutes ago.

For some though, this interpretation may not be quite 'violent' or dramatic enough.

Whatever the competitor attempts to do, the design needs to have a clear 'bound element' and also show this being unravelled or broken in some way. I hope you enjoy the interpretations.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS:

1ST ANNE DALE GAU SA

  

2ND PRITESH SHAH  KENYA              3RD  AMELIA LOUBSER OBU SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

JAYNE EDMONDS UK

HIGHLY COMMENDED  ELLEN-MAUD BARNARD WC SA

OTHER ENTRANTS

  

                   ANITA PATEL KENYA                  CAROL TAGGART EC SA INTERMEDIATE

BEVERLEY BUTTIMER IRELAND

  

CORRICE HOLMES   EC SA                ELIZE BADENHORST GAU SA

  

       JACKIE THERON WC SA            KANAKLATHA MEHTA PAKISTAN

  

                                                                      LIZ HOURELD GAU SA NOVICE                 LYNN DELL OBU SA

  

NAYNA PARRIN SHAH KENYA                    NAMITA SHAH KENYA

  

        PAT LARKIN UK                      PRIMILA LADHA KENYA

  

QURRAT AAMIR PAKISTAN                  RENEE VAN TONDER WC SA   

   

         SINIE OTTO GAU SA                 WENDY UDAL KZN SA NOVICE

 

CLASS ELEVEN: 'DIVAS DANCING'

WHAT DOES A JUDGE LOOK FOR?

Definitely not a doll or two or three bedecked in feathers 'dancing' in an arrangement of flowers! And probably not plant material fashioned as a dancer or couple of dancers unless it is done incredibly well - but even then, that interpretation may be too literal.

What is dance about? It is about lines, rhythms, repetitions and moving these to music. This is what needs to be captured in the design. Divas can be dancing to classical music so the lines may be graceful or to hiphop where the lines may be more angular and robotic looking.

As the competitor is being told that the dancers are divas, there better be some exotic looking plant material, bright colours and/ or shiny bling in the design for added class value.

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANT

BEV WESTHOF KZN SA

 

WINNERS OF THE CLASS - CONGRATULATIONS

1ST LES BRENT EC SA

  

2ND SUE FINGLETON AUSTRALIA     NICOLA DESMOND    IRELAND  

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

ANNIE NOMAN  PAKISTAN NOVICE

HIGHLY COMMENDED GERDA STOLS WC SA

COMMENDED GITA SHAH KENYA

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

AMELIA LOUBSER OBU  SA             HENNIE DE BRUIN EC SA

  

MEENA SHAH KENYA                             NAHIDA RAZA PAKISTAN

  

PRAVINA SHAH KENYA                        RITA GEHLOT KENYA

  

                SANITHA STEPHEN KZN SA      SHOBHNA KANTARIA  KENYA NOVICE

  

SUMINA HUMAYAN PAKISTAN                WILMA VAN WYK GAU SA 

  

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS TEN: 'DRAMA WITH DRIES'

Hallelujah for an easy explanation.

I know all about 'drama'. I would want to see a superb performance and, in this case, it has to be with dried plant materials. That simple.

This section was specifically included so that designers could pull all of the dried 'stuff' out of their cupboards, throw away the pieces that had been sitting around for ages and had basically disintegrated, spruce up what looked good and do a design. It was for those confined to home by fear of COVID to use what they had available without even having to step into the garden. But, oh dear, how many just had to add fresh plant materials Tut, tut!! If I were a judge in this section, you'd be penalised.

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANTS:

3RD - BEV WESTHOF KZN SA  - CONGRATULATIONS!!

ROSEMARIE BLAIR KZN SA

WINNERS -

  

    1ST KATH SHAW UK                        2ND GLENDA ADAMS EC SA

  

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED ROCHELLE MARCHESINI WC SA

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED

HELEN MITCHEL AUSTRALIA                    MEENA SHAH KENYA

  

COMMENDED

    ANTHEA DRAMAT WC SA INTERMEDIATE       FRED DU PREEZ OBU SA                 

OTHER ENTRANTS

COBIS WILSON WC SA INTERMEDIATE

  

DALENE GRUNDLINGH WC SA                ELIZABETH BROAD UK 

  

FAAN HAASBROEK SA              HARSHIDA SHAH KENYA

     

                           LYNNE STANAWAY UK                  NAVEED SHABBIR PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE  

  

NOREEN DONOVAN AUSTRALIA         PAULINE ARKESTEYN NETHERLANDS

  

VERONICA SHORT WC SA NOVICE             YASMIN SOHAIL PAKISTAN

 

                 ZENOBIA BOSCH GAU SA              AMOS RUDDEROW USA INTERMEDIATE

  

ANDRE DU PLOOY MFU SA              ANJUM MUDDASSIR PAKISTAN

 

GLENDA ADAMS EC SA                       ARUNA SHAH KENYA

 

 

WHAT WOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN CLASS 9: 'A CONTEMPORARY STILL LIFE' (TO BE TITLED)

This class demands a lot from the competitor. First of all, they have to tick the still life box, and that still life has to be contemporary. AND, as the designer has to give the still life a title, they need to interpret that title well too. THAT'S A LOT TO ACHIEVE.

It seems that every country that has a floral art rule book, defines still life slightly differently and has different requirements for this style.

In South Africa, a still life design allows the accessories to predominate over the plant material but these designs are not just about making a grouping of objects and some flowers (or other plant materials) work together. A still life has to tell a cohesive story and each object (and the plant materials) need to be there with purpose - not just because they look good.

The picture above is a still life design by Schalk van Dyk (President of Oranje Blomme Unie) for the South African Wine and Flowers promotion initiated by Hendra Gouws. You can see the predominance of objects that are not plant materials - although there is a lot of plant material in this design. You can also see that each object is there to add to the story - taking anything away diminishes what Schalk is trying to tell us about the complexity of wine production and presentation.

This is a great still life - but it is NOT a contemporary still life, even though this is a story of the current times.

So, what makes a still life contemporary?

A contemporary still life is all about the objects being designed in a way that the eye recognises as trendy and relevant to what is current in broad design terms. Designers need to think about what is current in terms of colour trends, fabric pattern trends, interior design trends, architecture etc. etc.

Any designer or judge who thinks modern and contemporary are the same is dreaming. Contemporary is what is trending now - you only have to look at advertising and product promotion and branding to see how differently things are done now compared to how they were done as little as five years ago. Design moves and evolves fast. Keeping contemporary requires a designer (and judge) to be aware of what is going on around them, and to be prepared to bring it to their designing even if they don't particularly like it!

I think there are some awesome contemporary still lifes in this section. There are also some still lifes that are super - but are not contemporary. When you look at the designs in Class Nine, remember ALL the things that have to be taken into consideration by the judges.

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANTS

COMMENDED  ROSEMARIE BLAIR KZN SA  CONGRATULATIONS!

AFRICAN FLAIR

  

LAUREN MICHEL KZN SA                   SNOOKS COLE KZN SA

DELICIOUS MONSTER                         WINTER TREASURES

 

WINNERS - CONGRATULATIONS TO

1ST - SCHALK VAN DYK OBU SA

PANDEMIC

 

2ND - JOSIE BRENNAN AUSTRALIA

FULL CIRCLE

3RD RITA GEHLOT KENYA

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - LYNN BOTTAMLEY UK

SAKI

HIGHLY COMMENDED - DIRK CRONJE-GREEF WC

ALONE WITH MY THOUGHTS

HIGHLY COMMENDED - NAFISA TAPAL  PAKISTAN

CALLIGRAPHY

OTHER ENTRANTS

  

AISHA ZAHID PAKISTAN                ANJNA BECHRA KENYA

       COLOUR MATTERS                       STYLE WITH CERAMICS

BERYL LIEBBRANDT GAU SA

RUBIES

  

JAYSHREE AGARWAL PAKISTAN              LIZA TUSTIN GAU SA

       NATURE'S BASKET                                  TRANQUILITY 

   

JULIE FABER GAU SA

      BUSHVELD LOVE AFFAIR 

      

MADHU SHAH AUSTRALIA                   MARY MANN GUA SA NOVICE

CONTEMPLATING CITRUS                           ALL LIVES MATTER

 

MARGARET HOVING WC SA NOVICE

  

NAHIDA RAZA PAKISTAN               NOSHEEN ARIF PAKISTAN

HAPPY MEMORIES                        ESCAPE TO DREAM

SAMINA AZHAR PAKISTAN NOVICE

THE BLISS OF NATURE

           

 

CLASS EIGHT - SURVIVAL INSTINCT?

This is a truly interpretive class as nothing in terms of the utilisation of the elements of design (line, shape, form, space, texture and colour) immediately jumps to mind.

So what is 'survival instinct'? Pull out a dictionary if you cannot define it succinctly. 'Survival instinct' is about self preservation. It is the ability to survive and thrive in less than ideal conditions. Think about how fynbos thrives after a fire, how animals adapt in less than ideal circumstances like drought, how flowers will bloom in the cracks between tarmac, how birds build nests in the precarious circumstances of a couple of twigs in trees that are often blown by the wind. When you start thinking of these things, you can perhaps start visualising a design.

This was not a popular class - perhaps because one had to go the extra mile with it. I attempted a design here and while I thought I had a brilliant idea, I couldn't get it right. And when I can't get something right, I fall horribly back into traditional placements. But I gave it a go - and have a few ideas of what I would do if I attempted something like this again.

So, I learned something and, ultimately, this is how an artist develops.

I think judges have to go into a class like this one with very open minds as they cannot possibly predict what will emerge from competitors. It all has to be a wonderful - or not so wonderful - surprise.

Congratulations to the winners:

1ST GHAZALA JAVID PAKISTAN

2ND HEATHER PATTON WC SA

    

3RD SHEILA DOUTHWAITE KZN SA INTERMEDIATE

  

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED ELSA KOLVER OBU SA 

HIGHLY COMMENDED PRITESH SHAH KENYA

OTHER ENTRANTS:

  

           VAUGHN HARRINGTON KZN SA           SANITHA STEPHENS SA 

   

    WENDY UDAL KZN SA             ANITA JORDAAN EC SA 

  

ANNE FLANAGAN IRELAND INTERMEDIATE    CLAIRE BRYANT UK   

     

           ELIZE BEZUIDENHOUT GAU SA      HINA KAMRAN PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE 

    

KIM ZIMMERMAN UK                            LOUIS VAN AS WC SA  

  

 

 

       PAULA DAVIS GAU SA INTERMEDIATE    VERONICA FRANCA NW SA INTERMEDIATE

CLASS 7 - THE WONDER OF WOOD

SO, WHAT SHOULD A JUDGE LOOK FOR IN 'THE WONDER OF WOOD'?

I must say that we could have filled this class easily three times over - it was the most popular choice, by far. And I'm going to be my usual nasty, controversial self and give a reason for this. It is because we are all a bit lazy and have a great piece of wood sitting in our design cupboards (that we've used a million times already but it generally wins a prize so we'll just pull it out, dust it off and give it a polish and try our luck - AGAIN!) I would suggest that you all go and put those prizewinning pieces of wood back in the veld to decay naturally and start looking for some new potential because all that recycling of the same pieces is holding back your growth as a designer.

Wood is wondrous and there is a lot of it around. Jill Hoskin gave us a taste, at her workshop presentation all the way back in 2018 at the S.A.F.U. Congress, of all the incredible things that can be done with wood - especially if you know a cooperative carpenter or are unafraid of wielding a saw and drill yourself.

Wooden mechanics that become part of the overall look of your design could be used in this section. Tooled wood as a contrast to something more rustic could be an option. Perhaps make something structural or sculptural out of different types of wood? But for me, a piece of driftwood plonked on the table along with some foliage and flowers (no matter how botanically perfect!!) would not cut it!

O.K. - you can all have a blast now!

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANT

BEV WESTHOF KZN SA

WINNERS - CONGRATULATIONS TO

  

   1ST NAINA SHAH KENYA       2ND  VIBHA DODHIA KENYA  

3RD SUNA MALHERBE OBU SA

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED

ILSE HOLROYD WC SA

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED

JEAN PLASKETT UK                       LOCIA HARTZER GAU SA

  

COMMENDED

EWALD WESSELS WC SA            ERONEL DE KOCK OBU SA

OTHER ENTRANTS

  

ANJAM MUDDASSIR PAKISTAN    CECILY MARTIN WC SA NOVICE

  

FELICITY FUSSEL GAU SA        GEORGE BURGER WC SA

  

CYNTHIA BROMWICH UK              DALENE GRUNDLINGH WC SA

  

GHAZALA SABAHAT PAKISTAN     JEANETTE HABLUTZEL WC SA

  

JEFF MILNE WC  SA                          MADHU SHAH AUSTRALIA

META RENCKEN KZN SA

 

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

CLASS 6  - SOMETHING WILD AND WOVEN

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRANTS

SNOOKS COLE KZN SA

WINNERS  - CONGRATULATIONS TO-

 

  

1ST KATHLEEN DEAN UK        2ND PRITESH SHAH KENYA

  

3RD ISOBEL GROBBLER NFU SA 

 

 

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED NIMITA SHAH KENYA

  

HIGHLY COMMENDED COBUS WILSON WC SA         

 

  

COMMENDED 

          SMITA RADIA PATEL KENYA          ANNIE NOMAN PAKISTAN NOV 

     

 OTHER ENTRANTS

  

CYNTHIA BROMWICH UK                 GEETS SHAH KENYA

ERONEL DE KOCK OBU SA  

  

FARAH KHURSHEED PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE

  

HUMA EHSON  PAKISTAN  NOV            JAYNE EDMONDS UK

  

                       JOAN JORRITSMA EC SA            LYNETTE VAN DER SPUY EC SA INTERMEDIATE

  

                          MARTIE VAN ROOYEN OBU SA     NEEMA SHAH KENYA  INTERMEDIATE 

  

RUKHSANA ALLY PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE   ZARIN PATEL PAKISTAN INTERMEDIATE

 

URSULA ELEY CANADA

 

 

CLASS FIVE: A STUDY OF SPACE AND SHAPE

I hope that Priya Shah (Kenya) won't mind if I use this lockdown design of hers to discuss shape and space.